Blue mountain pottery dating

blue mountain pottery dating

How do you date Blue Mountain Pottery?

Dating Blue Mountain Pottery can be difficult as the marks changed little (and sometimes later pieces were given marks from earlier ranges), but experts can sometimes date individual pieces by the glaze in conjunction with the pattern shape.

What is Blue Mountain Pottery?

Blue Mountain Pottery’s story began in 1947, when a group of skilled craftsmen pooled their skills and resources and began experimenting with the rich red clay of Ontario’s Georgian Bay region. They located at the base of Blue Mountain, along Georgian Bay’s southern shores.

What is the history of Weiders pottery?

The pottery began in a barn at Weiders Blue Mountain ski resort. After Tupy noticed the rich, red clay being turned over to create new ski trails, he and Weider used it to make pottery to sell in the resorts gift shop.

What is Blue Mountain glaze made of?

The glaze formula they developed contains ingredients which mold together at 1840 degrees Fahrenheit to produce the mirror-like gloss which has always been a Blue Mountain trademark.

How do I identify Blue Mountain Pottery?

Blue Mountain Pottery is made from red clay. Many potteries made items in a similar style from other clays, so checking for a base of red clay is an excellent starting point for identification. The unique glaze, melded from two different colors and finished with a mirror shine, is one of the most identifiable aspects of Blue Mountain Pottery.

What happened to the Blue Mountain pottery catalog?

After Blue Mountain Pottery closed, its molds were destroyed. Others have attempted to replicate it because of the popularity of the glazes. The company does not have a complete catalog record. However, experts can sometimes date items according to their shape, glaze color, and glaze thickness.

What kind of glaze is used on Blue Mountain Pottery?

The glaze used on Blue Mountain Pottery is distinct, with a traditional green hue and a drip glaze that gives each piece a unique coating. A process called “reflowing” is used in which two glazes are combined at high temperatures to create a “free flow” effect.

What does BMP mean in pottery?

The ‘BMP’ marks I had asked about stand for the Blue Mountain Pottery, which was founded by Czech immigrant Josef Weider (1909-71) in Collingwood, Ontario just after WWII. It took its name from the neighbouring Blue Mountains, which are a haven for tourists and skiers.

What kind of glaze is used on Blue Mountain Pottery?

The glaze used on Blue Mountain Pottery is distinct, with a traditional green hue and a drip glaze that gives each piece a unique coating. A process called “reflowing” is used in which two glazes are combined at high temperatures to create a “free flow” effect.

What color is under glaze?

The early under-glazes can range from a light tannish brown to an olivey green, or may be very dark green, or almost black. The drips can be various shades of green, light blue, turquoise and may have hints of cobalt blue, lilac. Many pieces were a rather dark green drip over black.

What are the characteristics of Blue Mountain Pottery?

The gloss creates a mirror-like finish. Blue Mountain Pottery exported many pieces to the United States, Great Britain, the Caribbean and Australia. The company was based in Collingwood, Ontario from 1947 to 2004. Blue Mountain Pottery specialized in vases, animals, jugs and pots made of red clay until the company ceased operations in 2004.

What are the different drips and under glazes?

From the beginning, through the early 60s, there is a great variation in the greens and blues seen in the drips. The early under-glazes can range from a light tannish brown to an olivey green, or may be very dark green, or almost black. The drips can be various shades of green, light blue, turquoise and may have hints of cobalt blue, lilac.

Related posts: